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Balance For The New Year

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Patanjali’s system of Yoga provides us with methodology to break down emotional and physical barriers that prevent us from knowing self-love and subsequently love for another.

In Ayurveda, the physical practice of yoga is an integral part of healing one’s body and mind.

Patanjali’s Sutras, in particular the Yamas and Ni Yamas entail simple principles to guide us in conduct and intentions that help us attain Samadhi- or balance in the body and mind. In a world where stimulus comes from so many places– when the pressures of life, work, children become too much – relationships often suffer. Strong principles rooted in common sense can have a profound effect on your making a good choice for a long-lasting relationship.

These sutras called the Yamas and Ni Yamas, form a template of commonsense principles to live by.

Find Equanimity With Patanjali’s Ten Yamas and Ni Yamas 

  • Ahisma: To practice ahisma means to never injure any living thing.  This includes injury inflicted by words as well as physical violence.
  •  Satya: Always speak the truth. Live honestly.  
  • Asteya: Do not always need (things) or people.
  • Bramacharya: Respect your body. Practice yoga, meditation or deep breathing.
  • Aparigraha: Think about what you can do for others. 
  • Saucha: Physical clarity. Keep your physical space clean and clutter-free.
  • Santosha:.  Try not to be overly concerned with finding fault in others or situations.   Create a domain of moksha or shanti (peace).  
  •  Tapas: Internal fire. Your relationships will be stronger if you have a personal physical practice that creates internal fire. 
  •  Swadhyaya: Self-inquiry.  This may be the hardest of them all.  No one likes to look at their words, their daily actions.  Take time each day and ask yourself if there was a situation, action or thought that contributed to someone’s pain or suffering.  
  • Ishwara Pranidhana: Let go of all negativity.  Let it wash away and live your life-

Namaste

Ramona Bessinger

 

ramonabessinger@gmail.com

http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

http://www.pranajunkie.net

Natural Solutions For Healthy Hair And Skin

For the hair:

I take generous amounts of ghee butter and scrub into strands of hair. I comb through my hair then braid it, creating a mask. Personally, I love to leave the ghee on my hair overnight then shampoo it off in the morning for extra deep moisture.
Steps to follow for your deep oelation:

Take chickpea flour and clean the surface of your skin by rubbing the powder all over your body.  Rinse flour-scrub off your body.

  • Pour all your fat, and essential oils into your hot water.
    Soak in tub for as long s you can stand it.
    Work the oil into skin and hair
    Towel-dry your body, and leave your healing oils on overnight to do their job.
    Make a ghee butter mask for hair and leave in overnight

 

 

Pink Flowers

For The Skin:

Coconut Bath

Half a jar of coconut oil
Essential camphor or mint leaves will do
Essential orange blossom or the peels of oranges
Try sweet smoky scent of khus, balsam, sandalwood, or jasmine.

Sesame Oil Bath

4 or more cups of Sesame oil
A generous serving of Shea butter is a must!
Essential rose or rose petals
Essential basil or basil leaves for the aroma
Hina, sandalwood or amber.

Sunflower Oil Bath

4 cups of Sunflower oil
Bergamot is a nice citrusy scent if the minty herbs are too much
Try amber or musk if the other oils are not available.

Home Renew

 

Ramona Bessinger LMT

http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

401-442-6462

Ayurveda Massage by Ramona Bessinger LMT

“Nature is the true physician”  Susanna Way Dodds

www.elephantjournal.com/2016/07/the-right-essential-oils-for-our-doshas/

I love essential oils.   In this article I explore the possible essential oils for your body type.  What scents work for you?

Essential oils are a beautiful way to help soothe the doshas, the physical body as well as the spiritual body. When you are having an off day or feel out of sorts, just a brief passing waft of an essential oil can help shift your mood.

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Rejuvenation

 

The scent from an essential oil in the form of a sachet or diluted in a base oil, neat (pure essential oil) applied direct can be used as an external mood elevator.

The scent of essence of jasmine can activate a positive memory and evoke feelings of love and sometimes elation. Knowing which oil soothes your doshas can further add to your aromatic experience.

Add rosemary to your scalp to help stimulate the follicles and promote healthy hair growth.

Basil, sweet orange, and essential bergamot combined elevate the mood.  Heal what ails you the natural way.

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Ramona Bessinger LMT

http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

Boost your immune system with daily self-oelation.

Prana Love: Essential Oils For Your Dosha, Heart And Soul.

Our skin is not merely an envelope, or a membrane allowing exchange between the exterior and interior of the body. It also serves as a mingling point between the outer world and inner self, and between body and soul. Miru Kim

Nourishing my skin and hair with food-grade oil and fat feels amazing. I use oil on my skin before a bath or a shower to moisturize my body and hair. I noticed as a result that this daily ritual of oelation has a secondary effect on my overall sense of well-being.

I feel great when I apply oil daily, and I do not feel so great if I let my skin dry out.

About a year ago, I started wondering why oil had this effect on my mood and sense of well-being. Looking to Ayurveda for the answers, I came across some interesting information published by Dr John Douillard.

Dr. Douillard states that the skin is estimated to house innumerable microscopic microbia per square centimeter. He goes on to note that these microbia help strengthen our immune systems. The oil we rub on our skin feeds the important microbe population that keeps the immune system strong.

But what about the surge of positive energy that comes from my daily routine of oiling my skin?

The great feeling is not accidental. According to Dr. Douillard, rubbing oil on the skin calms the nerves and soothes muscle tissue. The result is an easing of nervous tension. The doctor adds that the rubbing of oil on the skin helps stimulate oxytocin. This hormone helps elevate feelings of joy and peace.

The many ways oil can increase physical and emotional strength

So now, my daily ritual makes sense. It is not simply cosmetic, but rather a practice of self-abhyanga, anointing, that elevates my spirit while nourishing and softening my skin.

Daily self-oelation:

For my daily regime, I use sunflower oil. But you can use jojoba, sesame, coconut or anything that feels appealing to your body.

I love to apply my oils prior to a hot shower or bath. I have found that pre-shower application enhances the effect on skin and mood. The heat and open the pores, allowing the oil to soak in.
For a more intense sensation, and I mean intense, once a week I take a hot bath in as much oil as I can stand.

Here’s how I go about it. For deep–once- a week- oelation:

Fill a bath with the warm water, hot as you can stand it.
While the water is still warm, immerse your hair and head and rinse the warm water infused with fats and essential oil over your body.
Rub the oil all over the surface of your body.
Soak as long as you can.
Scrub your scalp and let the warm water, the scents, and fats penetrate your skin and hair.
Step out of the bath, and towel dry excess oils off body. Do not wash the oil off.

For my hair

I take generous amounts of ghee butter and scrub into strands of hair. I comb through my hair then braid it, creating a mask. Personally, I love to leave the ghee on my hair overnight then shampoo it off in the morning for extra deep moisture.

(One thing: remember to scrub that tub clean afterwards so you do not leave a slick surface)
Steps to follow for your deep oelation:

Take chickpea flour and clean the surface of your skin by rubbing the powder all over your body. Rinse flour-scrub off your body.
Pour all your fat, and essential oils into your hot water.
Soak in tub for as long s you can stand it.
Rub oil into skin and hair
Towel-dry your body, and leave your healing oils on overnight to do their job.
Make a ghee butter mask for hair and leave in overnight

Coconut Bath

Half a jar of coconut oil
Essential camphor or mint leaves will do
Essential orange blossom or the peels of oranges
Try sweet smoky scent of khus, balsam, sandalwood, or jasmine.

Sesame Oil Bath

4 or more cups of Sesame oil
A generous serving of Shea butter is a must!
Essential rose or rose petals
Essential basil or basil leaves for the aroma
Hina, sandalwood or amber.

Sunflower Oil Bath

4 cups of Sunflower oil
Bergamot is a nice citrusy scent if the minty herbs are too much
Try amber or musk if the other oils are not available

Namaste
Ramona Bessinger
http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

 

 

Could Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras Be The Answer To Peace and Equanimity?

Ayurveda and Everlasting Peace

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/06/ayurveda-and-your-path-to-lasting-love/

R

Embrace all ten principles expressed in Patanjali’s yoga sutras, and I guarantee everlasting love will come your way.

Patanjali’s system of Yoga provides us with methodology to break down emotional and physical barriers that prevent us from knowing self-love and subsequently love for another.

In Ayurveda, the physical practice of yoga is an integral part of healing one’s body and mind.

Patanjali’s Sutras, in particular the Yamas and Ni Yamas entail simple principles to guide us in conduct and intentions that help us attain Samadhi- or balance in the body and mind. In a world where stimulus comes from so many places– when the pressures of life, work, children become too much – relationships often suffer. Strong principles rooted in common sense can have a profound effect on your making a good choice for a long-lasting relationship.

These sutras called the Yamas and Ni Yamas, form a template of commonsense principles to live by.

Patanjali’s Ten Yamas and Ni Yamas To Try And Live By

  • Ahisma: To practice ahisma means to never injure any living thing.  This includes injury inflicted by words as well as physical violence.
  •  Satya: Always speak the truth. Live honestly.  
  • Asteya: Do not always need (things) or people.
  • Bramacharya: Respect your body. Practice yoga, meditation or deep breathing.
  • Aparigraha: Think about what you can do for others. 
  • Saucha: Physical clarity. Keep your physical space clean and clutter-free.
  • Santosha:.  Try not to be overly concerned with finding fault in others or situations.   Create a domain of moksha or shanti (peace).  
  •  Tapas: Internal fire. Your relationships will be stronger if you have a personal physical practice that creates internal fire. 
  •  Swadhyaya: Self-inquiry.  This may be the hardest of them all.  No one likes to look at their words, their daily actions.  Take time each day and ask yourself if there was a situation, action or thought that contributed to someone’s pain or suffering.  
  • Ishwara Pranidhana: Let go. Literally try to let go of the need to control everything. 

Namaste

Ramona Bessinger

 

ramonabessinger@gmail.com

http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

http://www.pranajunkie.net

Marma Points and Yoga Postures

The energetic release and metabolic flow you feel during yoga does not happen by accident.

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/05/marma-points-how-yoga-postures-heal-us-from-the-inside-out/

Marma points are where energy converges in the body. According to classical ayurvedic texts, these nodes can be found where nerves converge with muscle fibers, veins, bones, and joints. The points are junctures in the body where tissue, or the dhatus, meet. When oxygen and blood are delivered to these areas, there is an increase of chi or prana (life force) towards that area of the body.

Consider the placement of your hands, your feet, an elbow a twist, bind or inversion. The shape, the asana in yoga and the angle by which the posture is realized can either enhance the flow of prana or block it.

According to classical ayurveda, the seven bodily tissues are rasa (white blood cells) rakta (red blood cells), mamsa (muscle tissue), meda (fat, adipose tissue) asthi (bones, cartilage) majja (marrow tissue, connective tissue) and shukra (reproductive tissue). The body is like a super highway where there are intersections of tissue. At various intersections, twists, binds, inversions can enhance energy or prana. The asana maximizes the delivery of oxygen and blood to the body.

There are 108 marma points in the body, in classical ayurveda. If the point is pushed too hard, injury can occur. If the  point is stimulated correctly, as we see in the practice of asana, then life-force or prana is enhanced.

see the full article at http://www.elephantjouranl.com

(Enter Ramona Bessinger)

ekapada_shiva

Here are just a few postures every yogi will know –

Surya Namaskara (Sun Salutations)

Anterior Upper Body- Urah (Chest)

There are ten marma points or areas affected by the movement practiced in sun salutations. These movements stimulate cardiac function, lungs, thymus and immunity.

Starting with this asana is so important as you stimulate the respiratory system and cardiac output. Sun salutes generate heat in the body and enhance the conductivity of pranic energy; electric current, blood and oxygen.

Upper Back- Prushtha (Back)

There are twelve marma points affected by the actions performed during sun salutations. Here are a few: heart, lungs, bronchial tubes, kidney, bladder, colon, prostrate, cervix, liver, spleen, thyroid and spinal nerves.

Surya Namaskara A, B, and C is so important to yoga pracice as the organs and systems enhanced by the actions performed in this phase are a necessary first step in conditioning the body and mind.

Virabradhasana I, II, III (Warrior series)

The stimulated Marmani in Warrior I, II, and III and IV are in the lower extremities. There are at least six marma points, both posterior and anterior to the leg, which stimulate the heart, circulation, prana, thyroid and kidney.

Bakasana (Crow pose)

Arms- Urdhva Shakhah (Upper Extremities) Marmani

The Marmani stimulated in the arm and hands in crow are many. Urdhva Shakhah (upper extremities) points activated by the knee balanced on the back of the triceps stimulate the lungs, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, spleen and occipital nerves.

For every posture, there is a corresponding marma point. Knowing this can help deepen your yoga experience. Truth be told, the discussion on marma points and yoga postures could go on and on: It is an integral part of my assessment and bodywork. If you are interested in having a treatment or body assessment please contact www.pranajunki.net or message me at ramonabessinger@gmail.com.

Namaste,

Ramona Bessinger

http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

 

Yoga Postures Are Not Just Pretty Shapes

“… let me repeat that no asana practice is complete without sun worship. Without its focusing of mental energies, yoga practice amounts to little more than gymnastics and, as such, loses meaning and proves fruitless. Indeed the Surya Namaskara should never be mistaken for mere physical excersize –for something incidental, that is, that simply precedes the asanas of yoga. Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

As I drill down in my personal yoga practice, I find myself curious about the names each posture.  What can I learn from the mythology of yoga?  And, how can that mythology deepen my experience as a yogi?  

I find myself drawn to the Hindu myths surrounding yoga postures, specifically the metaphors in each story and the significance those metaphors have in relation to the energetic flow of each posture.  For this week, I think it makes sense to start with the Surya Namaskara ( Sun Salutations) and the Virabhadrasana series (Warrior 1, 11, 11, and IV as these are the shapes and the primary postures we start with in order to warm the muscles and nourish the mind.

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/05/know-the-mythology-of-yoga-postures-&-know-yourself

Surya Namaskara (Sun Salutations)

There are twelve names for the sun in Hindu.  Each name corresponds with one posture in the opening sequence.  The sun salutation sequence is beneficial to start with as it prepares the mind and body for the physical and spiritual practice.  Here is how I understand the symbolism behind Surya Namaskara.  The sun salutes tell the story of the rising sun.  Just like the dawn of a new day, the practice begins with manifesting internal sun energy to warm the body and prepare the mind.  Every day is new, and so we open the heart, lungs and spine with oxygen, heat and light-filled movements that mimic the same life-giving energy the sun offers the earth.

See the full article at http://www.elephantjournal.com

(Enter Ramona Bessinger)

In the same way the sun nourishes the earth, we nourish our bodies by opening the chest muscles and back muscles and honoring our lungs, heart, spine and brain. Sun Salutations represent internal fire and physical rebirth.  Without the sun, there would be nothing on earth.  Because of the sun we have growth, warmth, and life cycles seen in everything alive.  Sun salutes not only honor the sun but they help us to harness the nourishing sun energy within. In Hinduism, Surya is the chief solar deity, he is the son of Dyaush and the supreme god of light and love.  When we practice Surya Namaskara we are manifesting the life force and life giving qualities the Sun has to offer.

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Virabhadrasana Series (Warrior I, II, III)

In these postures we see the manifestation of the peaceful ahisma of yoga and the battle of avidya or the ego-mind. As the myth goes, Lord Shiva god of destruction as well as god of creation, manifests a warrior deity to fight his battle against King Daksha who is the father of Sati a Hindu goddess and wife of Lord Shiva.

Daksha orders Shivas death as he feels Lord Shiva is not worthy of his daughter’s hand. In order to protect himself, Lord Shiva manifests a warrior called Virabhadra who is sent to earth to slay the enemy.  In the story, Virabhadra slays the enemies of Lord Shiva.  Of course Shiva ends up victorious in his battle not because of physical muscle but because of his ability to remain focused and calm.

Like Lord Shiva, in yoga we fight our personal demons by remaining calm and non reactionary.  What the Warrior postures teach us is how to remain still in the face of adversity.  In that stillness we find answers and we overcome.  Warrior I, II, III and IV show us the way to peace as we remain still between action and reaction.

Look at the postures and notice how Warrior I suggests you are ready for battle, Warrior II, shows focus and aim, Warrior III, is the height of the battle, then Warrior IV, the battle is over and victory and peace is triumphant. The metaphor which initially escaped me, now makes perfect sense.  Overcoming all things that ail is within our personal power.  Virabhadra is in us all, we just need to remain still long enough to see that the strength we need to survive and thrive is inside our minds.  Remaining in the space between action and reaction is what made Virabhadra victorious.  Literally, we all harbor a spiritual warrior within  who is ready to fight the ego and self-ignorance which is the root of all our suffering.  Can’t wait to look deeper at all the wonderful postures yoga has to offer-

Know the myth so you can know yourself.  It is that simple.

Namaste,

Ramona Bessinger

 

http://www.JamestownHealingArts.com

In 2016 Resolve Never To Be Right Again

 

Quiet the chatter in your mind.  Make room for space, calm and ease

Chitta Vritti is the Sanskrit term to describe the constant flow of chatter in the brain. Chitta means seeing a situation through a sense, or a story. Vritti means repetitive waves of nervous energy. Together, the words paint a picture of a state of being that is loveless and worry-filled.  Known also as “monkey-mind,” the chitta vritti state of mind is wrought with nervous energy.

As the chitta vritti takes over, worry manifests and grows in the mind.

Space for calm and space for love is diminished and replaced with fear and anxiety.  The senses are dulled, the mind’s capacity to remain in a calm, loving state is also impaired. When this happens, the “monkey-mind” is takes over the calm mind.

In our quiet minds we can experience love, like in prayer or meditation. 

To love is to ignite the process of illumination in another being. This can only be done if your own mind is able to receive illuminating thoughts and feelings. Love is cellular growth, it is the exchange of energy. It the giving and the receiving of energy.

Being in a loving state is healthy

If love expands and allows for cellular growth, then the absence of love is cellular destruction. It is a slow death of the self. Every time you focus on an un-loving thought, you restrict breathing, prana is shortened, and cellular growth is diminished.  What follows are actions based on worry and fear, and in this space, no love can exist.

The negative monkey-mind destroys

The thinking mind is the part of the mind that sees the world and reports back to the brain. In this exchange, the mind has the ability to make choices about what it sees. In Sanskrit it is explained through the principle of tejas. Tejas is electric current in the body, when prana is strong, tejas is strong, when prana is weak and the monkey-mind is present, the body’s tejas is weakened.

Kundalini Shakti

Tejas helps the release of chitta vritti or chatter in the mind, it is released with the inhalation and exhalation of oxygen.  As you breathe and meditate, the bio-spiritual combination of kundalini shakti is released and the chitta vittri is pacified.  In this soothed state, the mind can make way for love, peace and calm.

Namaste,

Ramona Bessinger

 

http://www.jamestownhealingarts.com/